Dyer's Cottage

Legal documents dating back to the 18th Century

By Neil Fortey

Dyers Cottage indenture, 1762 - detail.
Dyers Cottage indenture, 1762 - detail.
Dyer's Cottage indenture, 1791 - detail of title and stamp
Dyer's Cottage indenture, 1791 - detail of title and stamp
Dyer's Cottage indenture, 1885 - detail of official stamp
Dyer's Cottage indenture, 1885 - detail of official stamp
Dyer's Cottage indenture, 1885 - detail of wax seals and signatures
Dyer's Cottage indenture, 1885 - detail of wax seals and signatures
Dyers Cottage indensture, 1885 - detail of title
Dyers Cottage indensture, 1885 - detail of title

An 18th Century Cottage

Dyers Cottage, No.9 Chapel Street, is named after Mrs Rosie Dyer who used live there. It is a modest, two-floored cottage located opposite the north end of Queen Street. Many old buildings have gone, including a terraced row of eight cottages that used to stand behind No.9, and were reached through the covered alley still seen between Nos 9 and 7 Chapel Street. These were known as Retford’s Cottages, and before that as Wright’s Yard following their acquisition in 1828 by a Dr Wright. Before this date, this row of cottages was used as a village workhouse, as indicated by documents recording their sale by the Overseers of the Poor and the Vestry.

A treasure trove of documents

The present owners, Nicky and Andy Wendler (proprieter’s of the Malthouse Deli), kindly made a box of old documents that go with the house available to the Living History Project. This is a treasure trove of legal papers or ‘Indentures’ marking the changing ownership of the cottage and adjacent buildings going back to the mid 18th Century.

Such documents are difficult to read, and the task of transcribing them has hardly begun. Though delicate, with wax seals and official stamps attached to them, they are mostly in very good condition, well worth preserving. To minimise handling, they have all (with the exception of two multi-page documents) been photographed or scanned. in the case of thirteen of the oldest, they have been scanned using the facilities made available by the British Geological Survey, at Keyworth, as part of their Public Understanding of Science policy. Such generous support is a major benefit to the Bottesford Living History Project.

The digital copies now form part of the project’s research archive. The pictures show details of seals, stamps and writing from these fascinating papers.

The British Geological Survey

The British Geological Survey is itself part of our history. Founded in 1835 in London, it moved to Keyworth during the 1980s and is part of the Natural Environment Research Council. It is one of the oldest geological survey organisations in the world, charged with recording geological resources and giving information and advice to the UK Government among others. It has an enormous wealth of maps, plans, rock specimens and over a million fossils. The Keyworth office also has a shop where members of the public may buy a range of maps, books, minerals, jewelry and other gifts. To learn more visit their web site by clicking:

British Geological Survey

This page was added on 29/01/2007.

Comments about this page

  • I grew up in Bottesford in the late forties, fifties and early sixties. I remember Rosie Dyer very well. She owned the small shop just across from her house. As a small girl, I used to go to tea at “Auntie Rosie’s” and afterwards I would play the piano for her. My grandparents (Will and Emma Canham) lived in one of the houses mentioned which were situated at the back of Rosie Dyer’s House. The houses consisted of a living room with a very small scullery and 2 small bedrooms upstairs. There was a small garden with several gooseberry bushes and as a child I spent many happy hours picking them and helping granny top and tail them.

    By carol pulford (04/01/2016)
  • Dear Carol, What a pleasure to her your memories from your childhood. Have you read the piece written by George and Tony Bolland (please go to http://www.bottesfordhistory.org.uk/content/places/streets/chapel-street/the-bolland-family) which has a lot to say about there memories of living in the cottages behind Rosie Dyer’s house on Chapel Street. We would be grateful for any further memories you would like to add, for instance about what the houses were like, who the other people round about were, and so on. Meanwhile, we hope you enjoy this website and look forward to hearing from you again. With best wishes, Neil Fortey (joint editor)

    By Neil Fortey (05/01/2016)
  • Thank you for your reply Neil. I took a look at the Bolland family photos, and the one of Retford Cottages took me right back to my childhood. I’m not too sure but I remember that one summer a girl about my age came to stay with her granny and we became friends. Unfortunately I cannot remember her name, but her gran looked very like the old lady in the photo. My grandparents lived in the first cottage and next door was occupied by Mr and Mrs Ashford. Unfortunately, Mrs Ashford died from food poisoning from eating chicken from their allotment. As I said earlier I spent my childhood in Bottesford – I was born in 1944 and lived there until my parents moved to Grantham when I was about 20. Whilst in Bottesford I was a member of the Brownies, Guides, and Youth Club plus lots more. I still have photos which might be interesting and also loads of memories. I will get the photos scanned and uploaded to you.
    Bottesford is a place that is still very much in my affections, and I would be pleased to hear from any of my old friends who sadly I have lost touch with.

    By carol pulford (05/01/2016)

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